Prince Hits Twitter’s Vine App With Copyright Infringement Complaint

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Twitter’s Vine app has been hit with a Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) infringement complaint from NPG Records, the record label of musician Prince.

The Next Web reported that NPG Records’ complaint states that eight video clips had “unauthorized records” and “unauthorized synchronizations” featuring his music and asked Vine to immediately remove them. Vine, which is a micro-video sharing app available on the iPhone, had only been in operation for two months before NPG’s complaint.

Twitter received the complaint on March 22 and the website ChillingEffects.org published the complaint a few days later. NPG Records provided links to the eight videos in question, but none of the links work, which suggests that Twitter may have followed up on the complaint and removed the videos from Vine.

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Since Vine is under Twitter’s wing, they both follow the same DMCA complaints procedures, which could mean that a tweet or video could be withheld or removed pending a response to the complaint. Twitter’s complaint procedures notes that it will make a “good faith effort” to contact the affected account holder on pertinent information regarding the takedown process and filing a counter-notification.

This isn’t the only time Prince and NPG Records have made copyright complaints against individual users in new media. For years, he has gone after YouTubers that recorded and uploaded his concerts or used snippets of his hit songs without his permission. He accused YouTube in a 2007 Reuters interview of choosing “not to filter out the unauthorized music and film content which is core to their business success.”

Although Prince’s methods of protecting his copyrights may seem draconian at best, if you feel that someone’s stealing your videos or your copyrighted content, read here.

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