Ashton Kutcher Tweets Against SOPA Bill

[UPDATE]

GoDaddy has just announced that it will no longer support the 2012 SOPA Bill after receiving negative feedback. PCMag.com reported that the Web site hosting company made the decision after a Reddit user signaled other users to remove their domains from GoDaddy before Dec. 29, causing the formation of Internet organization godaddyboycott.org

According to Politico.com, GoDaddy CEO Warren Adelman said, “As a company that is all about innovation, with our own technology and in support of our customers, GoDaddy is rooted in the idea of First Amendment Rights and believes 100 percent that the Internet is a key engine for our new economy.”

We’ll have to see what Ashton Kutcher has to say about this. 

 

Censorship is not a word we’re accustomed to hearing in the U.S. Americans value, make use of, and sometimes push the boundaries when it comes to freedom of speech. With the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA), introduced by the House late October, Web sites face the risk of being held accountable for allowing or assisting in copyright infringement  — and ultimately, being shut down by the government — a bill not well-received among many including Ashton Kutcher.

The “Two And A Half Men” star took to Twitter and his personal blog to share his thoughts on the issue, tweeting, “Blog post: SOPA is the problem and not the solution bit.ly/t3DcUZ

The actor tweeted again this morning, posting a video, titled “WTF is SOPA? aka The American Government trying to ruin the internet.”

According to foxbusiness.com, Web site hosting company, GoDaddy, announced that they would be supporting the SOPA Bill. When Kutcher caught wind of the new information, he tweeted that he would be removing his domains off the site.

According to Kutcher’s blog post, the actor believes that “Placing search engines and ISP’s in the middle of policing for piracy is plain and simply a bad and confused attempt by well meaning people that fundamentally don’t understand how the the Internet works.”

Forbes.com admits that the objective presented by the legislation is good, however, it is still too big of a risk to our freedom and thus, “the benefits are not worth the sacrifice.”

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