YouTube Network Creator Republic Cares Less About Size & More About Talent

There is a polarizing debate raging throughout the YouTube community right now. On one side, you have creators urging one another to join YouTube networks in hopes of building a richer more legitimized digital video landscape. On the other side, you have creators who believe studios are creating a system that only favors YouTube megastars.

Whether you love or hate networks, posting weekly videos is no longer all it takes to stand out among the thousands of serious YouTube creators. The problem that once was YouTube’s lack of exposure has now become an issue of oversaturation. All creators, not just the megastars, need a way to reach the largest possible audience – YouTube network Creator Republic is hoping to help every creator reach that audience.

Creator Republic is aiming to become a YouTube network that is less concerned about big names and more interested in undiscovered talent. “When we set out to launch Creator Republic we did it because we were pretty smitten with what we call ‘emerging creators,’” says Maggie Finch, Creator Republic CEO and co-founder.

 


The idea is this: YouTube has become a place where networks are necessary, but most networks are looking to sign already established creators with thousands of subscribers. “One of the problems with existing networks is that they offer a lot of support to only a select number of very big YouTubers. 99% of the other creators are left feeling underserved, “ Finch says.

Creator Republic is hoping to meet those 99% and give them the support they need to rise above, regardless of size. The fledgling YouTube network is primarily interested in supporting those with raw talent. As the creators of the Web’s first YouTube creator competition platform, King of the Web, the masterminds behind Creator Republic know talent when they see it. “We really got to know and appreciate the undiscovered talent on the Web,” Finch says explaining her and her team’s expertise when it comes to web talent.

YouTube’s landscape is quickly becoming dotted with new networks sprouting up over night, so how is Creator Republic different? Finch explains, “We really want to be flexible. We want to help them [creators] own themselves. We’re not the creators, we’re not Hollywood executives, and we’re not filmmakers. We truly are business people with a passion for video on the Web and for creators on the Web.”

YouTube creators are facing a brand new world, one where networks are the new kingmakers and one-shot cat videos just won’t cut it. It can be intimidating out there for rookie creators. As Finch explains, Creator Republic is there to help them navigate this new ecosystem by “Being there to understand it, help support them, help package those opportunities, help improve content – it all seems like a good place to be.”

The good folks at Creator Republic are keeping their signed talent under wraps for now, but in the meantime you can apply to be part of Creator Republic here.