Can Vidfall Succeed Where Groupon Failed?

The major problem with Groupon, who is still flapping around the internet the way a fish does on dry land, is that they weren’t very good at making money for their clients. In fact, they were terrible at it and many of the businesses who offered great deals (frequently at a loss) never saw repeat customers (that’s bad). Enter Vidfall.

The new site utilizes third-party advertising to enable great deals, so everybody wins. Say you want a $3,000 gift certificate to Baskin Robbins; you can get that card for substantially less by watching advertisements for other products — and those companies pay for the price reductions. The price rate differs for each commercial depending on the product’s initial cost. So certain items might be more time-productive than others. And theoretically, you can get all these offers for free if you sit around all day watching ads (which if you sit around all day watching ads, you need free stuff because you prob don’t have a J-O-B.).

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Groupon (and its sales model) exploded in popularity because the internet loves the idea of getting something for much cheaper than they deserve (sorry, music industry). Vidfall basically eliminates the shortcomings of punishing clients and yet, still rewards customers. Everybody wins! But then again, are you really going to sit around and watch a dozen ads just to knock a couple bucks off a voucher for Cheesecake Factory?

I guess we’ll see if the internet beats a path to Vidfall’s door or if, like Groupon, they wind up struggling with all this oxygen around them.